What Science Says You Can Do to Help Reduce Your Cancer Risk

Millions of people are diagnosed with cancer each year, and while not all cases of cancer are preventable, between one third and one half of these cases could be prevented by changing some everyday behaviors. Knowing that your behavior can have a real impact on your health is helpful, but what specific things can you do? Here’s some advice backed by scientific evidence that may help prevent certain cancers: Don’t start or quit smoking. You…

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Exercise to cure depression: why moderated effects are so helpful

One of the areas of research I’m interested in is exercise. Most of us are aware that exercise benefits our well-being. It helps keeps our heart strong, maintain a healthy weight, and combat stress. However, is exercise so good it works as well as pharmaceuticals? The more radical exercise evangelicals claim it can. Some assert that exercise can cure depression and stop cancer. Are any of these claims true? 

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The silver lining: research on personal growth after trauma

Research on stressful life events like receiving a terminal diagnosis or the impact of losing a job has focused primarily on the negative psychological effects of such events.  However, clinicians and researchers began to realize that many of their patients were reporting positive changes after experiencing adversity. Interviews with cancer patients and other samples found, as a surprise to many mental health professionals, that many people saw a “silver lining on the dark cloud”  to…

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Positivity and cancer progression: what’s the evidence?

Here are two really interesting recent editorials about the role of positive attitudes in cancer progression.  One article harshly criticizes the “positive psychology” movement of lacking in scientific sophistication (Coyne & Tennen, 2010) and the other defends the research that has been done thus far (Aspinwall & Tedeschi, 2010). This is the most heated researchers get, very entertaining!

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Correlation, causation, or association – What does it all mean???

From allaboutaddiction.com: A comment posted by a reader on a recent post reprimanded me for suggesting that marijuana caused relationships to go bad. While in that instance the reader was mistaken, as I had specifically used the word associated, the comment made me think that maybe I should explain the differences here. I’m a scientist studying addiction, and in the field, it’s very important to be clear about what each of the words you use…

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